Aims

 

Design and technology is about providing opportunities for students to develop their capability, combining their designing and making skills with knowledge and understanding in order to create quality products. Secondary design and technology builds on the skills and knowledge children have already learnt at primary school. At its core, is creativity and imagination, Students learn to design and make products that solve genuine, relevant problems within different contexts whilst considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. To do this effectively, they acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on additional disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art.
 
Design and technology is a practical and valuable subject. It enables children and young people to actively contribute to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of themselves, their community and their nation. It teaches how to take risks and so become more resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable. Students develop a critical understanding of the impact of design and technology on daily life and the wider world. Additionally, it provides excellent opportunities for students to develop and apply value judgements of an aesthetic, economic, moral, social, and technical nature both in their own designing and when evaluating the work of others.

Staff and Resources

The faculty is staffed by 5 dedicated teachers who between them have teaching experience of over 35 years.  Students are taught in small groups of 21 students per class.

The department has three specialised workshops for students to design and make products.  There is also a graphics and electronics room for the technology aspect of the subject.  Students also have access to an Apple Mac Suite and computer rooms with desktop PC’s.  Students learn as well to use specialist equipment such as the 3D printer and laser cutter.

Key Stage 3 - Years 7-9 Design Technology

 

KS3 Design and Technology

 

The curriculum at Key Stage 3 students are taught in small class sizes of no more than 22 students due to the practical nature of the subject.  The subject is run on a carousel basis whereby students rotate through Projects related to Design and Technology.

 

KS3 Design and Technology

 

Year 7:

Various 4-5 week Projects - Roller Ball (Wood based), Biscuit Cutter (Metal based), Pop up Greetings Cards (Graphics based), Jewellery Project (Smart Material based), The Key Ring Project (2D Design - CAD and Laser Cutter Project) and Design a Mould Project (Polymers and Vacuum Forming)

Year 8:

Graphics Portfolio:  (Graphics based Portfolio Project, incorporating 2D Design)

Container Project: (Wood based Portfolio Project)

Year 9:

Metals Project: (Design a pewter cast Jewellery project)

SolidWorks:  (CAD and CAM Portfolio Project and 3D Printer)

 

 

Key Stage 4 - GCSE Design Technology

 

Why Study Design Technology?

Design and technology is a practical and valuable subject. It enables Students to actively contribute to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of themselves, their community and their nation. It teaches how to take risks and so become more resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable. In Design and technology it is about providing opportunities for students to develop their capability, combining their designing and making skills with knowledge and understanding in order to create quality products. At its core, is creativity and imagination, Students learn to design and make products that solve genuine, relevant problems within different contexts whilst considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. To do this effectively, they acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on additional disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art.

 

GCSE Design Technology

 

GCSE Design and Technology will prepare students to participate confidently and successfully in an increasingly technological world. Students will gain awareness and learn from wider influences on Design and Technology
including historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic factors. Students will get the opportunity to work creatively when designing and making and apply technical and practical expertise. Design and Technology allows students to study core technical and designing and making principles, including a broad range of design processes, materials techniques and equipment. They will also have the opportunity to study specialist technical principles in greater depth to prepare them for the world of work and university.

Design and technology is a practical and valuable subject. It enables Students to actively contribute to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of themselves, their community and their nation. It teaches how to take risks and so become more resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable. At its core, is creativity and imagination, Students learn to design and make products that solve genuine, relevant problems within different contexts whilst considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. To do this effectively, they acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on additional disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering and computing.

Assessment Structure:

Written Exam:

• 2 hours 100 marks, 50% of GCSE
• Questions Section A – Core technical principles (20 marks)
• Section B – Specialist technical principles (30 marks)
• Section C – Designing and making principles (50 marks)

Coursework:

• 30–35 hours approx., 100 marks, 50% of GCSE
• Non-exam assessment (NEA):
• Contextual challenges to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission.
• Students will produce a working prototype and a portfolio of evidence (max 20 pages).  

 

Student Voice:

Danielle, 10 Demeter   "I would say design technology is one of my favourite subjects as you are able express and develop your creativity. I can transfer my ideas but also what I have learnt in lessons, directly into physical projects by designing my own product. I think the main difference between KS3 and GCSE D.T is the fact that you are able to be more independent and express your innovative ideas more freely. I would really recommend taking GCSE D.T if you want to show your creative side whilst learning new skills."

 

Related Careers / A-level progression


Careers:

Industrial Design, Product Design, Graphic Design, Engineering, Medical Product Design, Teaching, Architecture, Film Set/Theatre Design, Special Effects Development, Property Development and Interior Design.

A-level entry requirements:

Students must gain grade 6 or above to take Product Design at A-level.


Need more information?

Please come and see Mr Quinn in Room 26 or email Mr Quinn at jquinn3.303@townleygrammar.org.uk


Selection criteria in the event of over subscription:


If oversubscribed, the students year 9 grades will be taken into account.

 

 

Key Stage 5 - A Level Product Design

Why study Design Technology at A Level?

 

This creative and thought-provoking qualification gives students the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and confidence to succeed in a number of careers. Especially those in the creative industries. They will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by producing prototypes of their choice. Students will gain a real understanding of what it means to be a designer, alongside the knowledge and skills sought by higher education and employers.

 

Course Requirements:

B in Graphics, resistant Materials, or Product Design and attend a meeting to show portfolio.

 

Essential Skills:

In order to take A level Product Design not only do you need a passion for Design you also need to have excellent organisational skills and the ability to problem solve effectively. You will need to be self-motivated and disciplined to meet coursework deadlines whilst still preparing for the examination.

  

A Level - Product Design (AQA)

The course content enables students to further develop their knowledge and understanding of materials and components, design and market influences and processes and manufacture.

 

Assessment Structure:

 

Paper 1

What's assessed

  • Technical principles

How it's assessed

  • Written exam: 2.5 hours
  • 120 marks
  • 30% of A-level

Questions

  • Mixture of short answer and extended response.

Paper 2

What's assessed

  • Designing and making principles

How it's assessed

  • Written exam: 1.5 hours
  • 80 marks
  • 20% of A-level

Questions

  • Mixture of short answer and extended response questions.

Section A: Product Analysis: 30 marks, Up to 6 short answer questions based on visual stimulus of product(s).

Section B: Commercial manufacture: 50 marks, Mixture of short and extended response questions

Non-exam assessment (NEA)

What's assessed

  • Practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles.

How it's assessed

  • Substantial design and make project
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of A-level

Evidence

  • Written or digital design portfolio and photographic evidence of final prototype.

 

 

Related Courses and Careers:

Courses:  Physics, Maths, Art, Engineering and Media.

Careers:  Industrial Design, Product Design, Engineering, Graphic design, Medical Product Design, Teaching, Architecture, Film Set/Theatre Design, Special effects development

Property Development and Interior Design.

 

 

Enrichment

 

Key Stage 3 Design and Technology

Royal Horticultural Society

 

 

The Design and Technology department has a successful partnership with the RHS (“Royal Horticultural Society”).  The partnership was created to enrich the learning of students.  As part of our Partnership we pilot class activities to embed Horticultural into the Design and Technology curriculum.  Year 9 students take part in the RHS Wisley Garden Design competition.

The department have RHS educational workers that come in and give practical inputs from Horticultural to Landscape Architects who display gardens at the Chelsea flower show.  These industries come and talk to the students and our students benefit from trips to RHS Wisley, Hampton Court Flower Show and The Chelsea Flower Show. 

 

 

Key Stage 5 – Product Design

Students will be encouraged to visit museums, galleries and various exhibitions to gather research that will inspire their coursework, we also run a number of trips at A level including a trip to New York here students look at the design history of Art Deco, study the Architecture of the city, visit museums such as MAD, MOMA & the MET and get gain life experience to developed their creative minds.

 

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